Motivation

Motivation

Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what keeps you going.

            -Jim Rohn

How to become motivated? How to stay motivated? What motivates you? For every person, the answer to these questions will be different. People find diverse ways to become motivated, and maintain it. What motivates each individual is also very subjective, and depends on whether they rely on extrinsic or intrinsic sources.

I find motivation is always hard to find, and none so hard then in the silly season. You become so busy with Christmas parties and preparation, last minute gift shopping, wrapping, cooking and cleaning! The list seems endless. Then after it all dies down you are just so tired. You just want to curl up on the couch with a good book and rest for weeks! The silly season is a good reason to rest for a while, take a break from writing, recharge your batteries and come back to it with a fresher mind and different perspective. This can actually inspire you and help make good progress when you sit down to write again. However, what about the rest of the time? The struggle to become motivated, and maintain it, is a big one. I know I labour with it, and that is what inspired this blog.

Basically we need to think to plan, but we need to feel to act. So, once you have the thinking and planning out of the way, how do you build up those emotions so you can get things done? Personally, I focus on what I imagine the finished product will be; the sense of pride I get from seeing a project through; and hopefully all the positive feedback I will receive! It seems I rely on a mix of both intrinsic and extrinsic motivators. Take a moment to think about what makes you feel good about your writing? Why do you write? The answer to these questions will help you ascertain what motivates you. Use these to help keep up your motivation.

Lack of motivation can also hit when the writing project in front of you seems insurmountable. The sheer size and extent of the venture before you can be daunting and overwhelming. In this case, I break the overall big project down into smaller assignments that I can tackle one by one. Each time I tick of a task, it sends a little thrill of achievement and pride through me. This is what helps maintain my motivation and complete the bigger project.

You can create a “motivation board”. Like a mood board, use it to pin up all those things that motivate and inspire you. Keep it somewhere close to where you usually write. Then each time you feel yourself lagging, look up at that board and let it inspire and motivate you to keep writing!

How to Motivate Yourself at Anytime by Jane Genovese has some great ideas on motivation. It is well worth a read for more tips and ideas.

Motivation is a personal thing. You simply need to find what motivates you and use it to the best of your ability to keep going. The more you write, the easier it will become.

 

 

Point of View Exercise

Point of view exercise-2

Point of view is a very important consideration when planning your writing project. It can draw your reader in as though they are experiencing the story themselves, or it can place them further away so they are observing from a distance.

I find it helpful when planning my writing projects to write the same paragraph from different points of view. It helps me to figure out which point of view I feel most comfortable with and creates the most powerful story. Not only is the exercise helpful to plan your writing project, it is also a great warm up exercise!

This exercise is fairly simple. Pick a paragraph, conversation or scene that you have roughly formed for your writing project. It doesn’t have to be perfect, a rough draft will be fine. Then write this small piece of your story from as many different views as you would like.

Take your time to really explore each different perspective. When you are done read over each one carefully. What are the benefits from each? Which point of view didn’t work? Which point of view do you believe managed to capture the story as you pictured it? Which perspective do you feel the most comfortable with? These questions will help you weed out the points of view that didn’t work for your writing piece.

The aim after this exercise is to help you pick the point of view that will create the most powerful story, one the reader will relate to and want to read again and again!

 

 

Point of View

Point of View-2

One of the most important decisions you will make when planning your writing piece is what point of view you will write in. Your choices for point of view are many and powerful. It provides the means for how the readers enter your story and can change the depth and emotion of that story depending on how close the reader is to the action.

What is your point of view? Where are you standing when you write your sentence, your paragraph, and your story? Whose eyes are you looking out of? The characteristics of the person telling your story, and how close that teller is to the action can change your story completely. Consider the various points of view you can use carefully when planning your writing project in order to create the biggest impact.

These sites are a great resource for defining and explaining the different points of view available for your use when writing your project.

Literature – Exploring Point of View.

Understanding Point of View in Literature.

Different Types of Point of View – The Beginning Writer.

Consider their various advantages and disadvantages carefully when picking which point of view you would like to tell your story from.

First Person POV: This viewpoint is limited to your chosen narrator’s point of view. Your story is told from their perspective, therefore your written words must sound like them, what their character would think or feel or do. Typically the narrator writes using “I” when applying this point of view. The advantage of this viewpoint is the reader is close to the action, emotionally and physically. It will draw them in close to your narrator’s story and help build a solid rapport with the narrator. The disadvantage of this POV is you are limited to only what the narrator knows, senses and feels. You are stuck to one person’s perspective.

Third Person Limited POV: This viewpoint is similar to first person POV, however the character’s name, or third person pronouns such as he, she, they or them are used instead of I. The narrator is you, the writer. You tell the story from the characters POV. The advantages and disadvantages of this POV are the same for first person POV.

Third Person Multiple POV: This viewpoint allows you to write from several different characters points of view. The advantages of this is the reader will have knowledge of most aspects of the story, as opposed to being limited to only one person’s perspective, they will be able to see all parts of the story unfold. However, the disadvantage is it can create confusion in your readers if not handled carefully. You must ensure the transition from one character to another is distinct.

Omniscient POV: A “god-like” point of view. You write the story as if you are all-knowing and all-seeing. The advantages of this are the narrator knows the past, present, and future and can share with the reader at any time. The disadvantages of this are the reader is removed from the main character and may not be able to relate to the characters as well.

When you choose which point of view you would like to tell your story from, you typically need to stick to that viewpoint. If you chop and change it can be jarring and doesn’t make for nice reading. To keep your readers interested and invested in your story you must be consistent.

If you are finding it hard to choose there is a point of view exercise that can help you ascertain what viewpoint will be the best to tell your story from.

POINT OF VIEW EXERCISE