Where do you find your Inspiration?

Where do you find your Inspiration?

Following on from last week’s post “Was Thomas Edison Right?” I started thinking about inspiration. I want to know where you find your inspiration? When your well of idea’s dries up, you are staring at a blank page with no creative flow, or you hit writers block during a project, where do you go or how do you spark those creative thoughts again? How do you overcome the dreaded idea drought?

No matter how much you love writing, and are enjoying your current writing project there will always be times when you suffer from a lack of inspiration. I know I do. I have a myriad of different sources for re-sparking the idea process to help the words flow again. For me, it depends on the mood I am in and also why I am suffering from the so called writers block, which technique I use. Every person is different, so will find different means and ways to find inspiration. Below are a few of my favourites that I have found invaluable during my writing journey and career.

Writing Warm-Ups

There are hundreds of writing warm-up exercises that are designed to loosen up your creative muscles and aid flow of thought. Some of my favourites are free writing, word jar and random word link. I find that they help me to relax into my writing, so when I turn back to my current project the ideas and words flow so fast my hands can barely keep up typing.

Books

I love to read. I could spend hours and hours curled up in one spot with a good book. And one of the best things about reading is you can draw inspiration and ideas from the plot, characters, setting, dialogue or themes of the book. If you find you are stuck, try reading a book by your favourite author or even branch out into a different genre.

Movies

Much like reading, movies can inspire great ideas for your next book. You may enjoy the lead character so much you decide to model your main character on them. Or a certain scene or dialogue may set off those creative sparks and before you know it you have outlined your next book!

Art

I don’t know about you, but I find looking at photos, prints, sculptures and paintings to be a great source of inspiration. What story is the artist trying to say? What emotions are they conveying? What does the scene/character/setting tell you? What would happen next? You can ask these questions, and more. Write it down if you want, you never know your next story may start taking form.

Blogs

Reading other blogs on any topic you wish can help jolt your brain into creative mode. Whether you are stuck for ideas for a blog, article, novel, and short piece or content, someone else out there is sure to have some inspiration for you.

History

Don’t know what your next novel should be? Try reading up on some history. There are many stories waiting to be told, whether fiction or non-fiction. Sad, happy, tragic, triumph, good and evil; our history holds many different themes and rich characters that combine to create inspirational stories.

Honouring our soldiers, Australian War Memorial, ACT

Honouring our soldiers, Australian War Memorial, ACT

Maheno Shipwreck, Fraser Island, QLD

Maheno Shipwreck, Fraser Island, QLD

Exercise

I find turning my mind away from writing for a while is a great way to develop more ideas. Go for a run, to the gym, a yoga class or any form of exercise you fancy and work out your physical muscles. Sometimes the ideas hit me whilst I am working out, other times they don’t hit until I am in front of the computer or journal again. Regardless, exercise is a great way to clear your head and work out any frustrations you have with your writing.

Walking/Nature

Take a stroll outdoors and marvel at the great outdoors. Appreciate the beauty of the landscape around you, whether it is rural or city. Use it to clear your mind and as a source of inspiration. Write what you see, smell, hear and feel.

Autumn colours

Autumn colours

Cross by the Lake

Cross by the Lake

Walking along the beach at Jarvis Bay

Walking along the beach at Jarvis Bay

Journal

Writing in a journal has long been recommended as a source of inspiration and a way of keeping your ideas together. It is a great way to get all the junk clogging up your brain out. Cultivating the habit of writing in your journal daily helps to clarify your thoughts, and ensures you never forget a great idea again! Write down your thoughts, inspirations, over heard dialogue, plot ideas, characters, dreams, or anything else you want. Read back through your journal whenever you hit a slow patch or writers’ block for ideas and inspiration.

Shower

I seem to always have my best ideas when I am in the shower, which is unfortunate as there is no easy way to record them whilst showering. It is also a great way to relax tired and achy muscles from hunching over a computer.

People Watching

People are always a great source of inspiration. Find a place to sit where you can quietly observe those around you. Listen to the way they speak, walk, laugh and sit. You can develop characters from those around you. Not to mention you may overhear some great story that serves as inspiration.

And finally…good old Google!

Simply search the topic you are currently writing on and you can find tons of great resources to help you out.

 

So there you have a few of my favourite techniques to help with inspiration and creativity. I would love to hear where and how you find inspiration!

 

 

 

Was Thomas Edison Right?

Was Thomas Edison Right?

Most people will have heard the famous Thomas Edison quote:

“Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration”.

But how true is this for you?

I believe that inspiration gives you a starting point, the sudden flash of an idea that forms the skeleton of a story. But after that, it is your craft, skills, hard work and a lot of elbow grease that will see you over the finish line. Without that follow through and hard work your spark of inspiration will stay just that; a simple idea, an ephemeral dream, a flicker of light burning in your mind.

That is not to undervalue the need for continual inspiration. Inspiration provides the fuel to keep you going and the drive to finish your writing project. Once you have that initial idea the hard work starts of the planning, development, writing, re-writing, editing and formatting. However, along the way you may find you suffer from writers block, lack of motivation, doubt, or simply being uninspired. This is where perspiration (from all your hard work) can lead to inspiration. It sounds counterintuitive, but it is true. Once you start planning, writing and editing, once you gain momentum with your writing project, then further inspiration will follow. You all know what I am talking about. You may be editing a scene, dialogue or descriptive passage when you get another flash of brilliance, you can see it all unfolding in your mind. Or maybe you are stuck on a certain scene, so you take a break from staring at your computer. Perhaps you go out for a walk, when inspiration hits you again. You can see that scene as though you are living it yourself. And suddenly the words flow out of your mind, faster then your hands can keep up.

So for me, Thomas Edison had the right idea, but not the right balance. I think it is more like a 30/70 split. The initial inspiration would be nothing without perspiration. It is what you do with those idea’s that matters, and then to build on those ideas and write a best seller you need a little more inspiration.

So do you think Thomas Edison was right? Is genius one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration?

 

 

 

 

How To Write Great Description

How to utilise Descriptive Writing

Description is one of the strongest tools in your writing arsenal. The purpose of descriptive writing is to show your reader who, where or what you are writing about. If you are skilled enough the reader will form a picture in their mind based on your words and with a small amount of imagination to fill in any gaps. The best way to capture your readers’ imagination and pull them into your story is to utilize all five senses in descriptive detail. You need powerful verbs and adjectives, which we will discuss at a later time. All together these skills generate a sense of realism and authenticity in your writing that will leave your reader asking for more.

For example:

She raised the glass to her lips and sipped the wine.

Or.

She raised the crystal wineglass to her lips and tasted the velvety red wine.

As you can see the second example uses sight and taste to show the reader not only what the woman is drinking, but what she is tasting. Your jobs as a writer is to make your reader want that wine; describe it in such perfect detail that they can see, smell and taste it. This is the key to great description.

When talking about person and place, describing the sight, taste, feel and smell of the surroundings is the most effective way to engage your reader. However, when you wish to convey strong emotions the best way is to not mention that emotion at all. It may sound silly, but the best way to engage your reader and to help them feel what your characters are feeling is to show them.

If you simply write “he is sad,” you are telling your reader what your character is feeling. It feels flat and uninspired.

However, what if you wrote:

He sat on the couch, his bowed head resting in his hands, aching for one last hug.

Your reader will feel your characters heart ache, they will feel his sadness and hopefully be able to relate to him. This creates connection and rapport with your character and story. It is an invaluable skill to have as a writer and one that will be sure to garner the attention and interest of your readers.

Artists use different mediums to show their feelings and paint a story, we as writers do this with our words. Our goal is to involve our reader, to make them see, feel and taste what we do when we write. Our words and descriptions is what makes our stories memorable, gives depth to our characters, and keeps our readers interested and invested in the story. The Lit Candle Exercise I have discussed previously is a great way to tap into these descriptive writing skills, however there are many more out there. I would love to hear your techniques or tips for developing great description and how you use them for your writing projects.